Cross-Border Collaboration Project in BCR 12

Cross-border collaboration for bird conservation on managed forest lands

 

This project is a collaboration with SFI and ABC to develop actionable science to support the conservation of birds on managed forest lands in the Boreal Transition Region of the US and Canada. 

PROJECT SUMMARY

BAM is collaborating with the Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI) and American Bird Conservancy (ABC) to develop a cross-border initiative for bird conservation on managed forest lands. The project area is the Upper Great Lakes region of BCR 12 (Boreal Hardwood Transition). The cross-border project will focus on the co-production of actionable science with local forest industry, government, and community partners to identify opportunities and challenges for forest management to benefit bird populations.

Within BAM this project is led by Andy Crosby.

WORKSHOPS & WEBINARS

On June 3, 2020, we held an e-workshop to present the project proposal and begin to engage potential partners. Following this workshop, we received substantial interest in this project as well as volunteers to participate in a steering group to help develop goals and a plan to move this project forward.

Learn more and watch a webinar for this project. 

DATA

We have been soliciting additional data for the United States portion of the BCR 12 study region. If you have data from this region and would be willing to share it with BAM or this project please contact us.

Related Posts & Highlights

New Publication: Response of birds to the effects of caribou conservation, harvest, fire, and energy-sector impacts

New Publication: Quantifying long-term bird population to responds to the effects of caribou (Rangifer tarandus) conservation, harvest, fire, and energy-sector development in Alberta.

As interest in caribou conservation continues to increase, there is growing interest in understanding potential trade-offs or co-benefits with other species. This new paper, led by Lionel Leston investigated how boreal birds will respond to the cumulative effects of caribou conservation, harvest, fire, and energy-sector development in Alberta. The results demonstrate that caribou-centric forestry plans have minor co-benefits for avian species in Alberta. Read more...

CITATION

Leston, L., Bayne, E., Dzus, E., Sólymos, P., Moore, T., Andison, D., Cheyne, D., Carlson, M., 2020. Quantifying Long-Term Bird Population Responses to Simulated Harvest Plans and Cumulative Effects of Disturbance. Front Ecol Evol. 8, 252. https://doi.org/10.3389/fevo.2020.00252

Response of birds to the effects of caribou conservation, harvest, fire, and energy sector impacts in Alberta

Response of birds to the effects of caribou conservation, harvest, fire, and energy sector impacts 

Quantifying Long-Term Bird Population Responses to Simulated Harvest Plans and Cumulative Effects of Disturbance in Alberta

Project Summary

As interest in caribou conservation continues to increase, there is growing interest in understanding potential trade-offs or co-benefits with other species. In 2019-20, we continued our efforts to estimate possible impacts on boreal bird populations resulting from various harvest management options in the Al-Pac forest management unit. Using the cure4insect decision support tool, we applied avian habitat models to the landscapes forecasted under different timber supply scenarios, including a caribou conservation scenario, to anticipate bird population response . We extended this work further using a custom-built ALCES Online simulator to explore impacts of fire and energy – in addition to forest harvest – for the caribou conservation scenario. We projected how population sizes of several species including Black-throated Green Warbler, Canada Warbler , Olive-sided Flycatcher, Cape May Warbler  and Palm Warbler  would respond to differences in harvest locations, energy sector development, and either increases or cessation of forest fires. 

 

Project Partners

This project was led by Lionel Leston and is a collaboration with Al-Pac and the ABMI.  For more information please contact us. 

Publications

Leston, L., Bayne, E., Dzus, E., Sólymos, P., Moore, T., Andison, D., Cheyne, D., Carlson, M., 2020. Quantifying Long-Term Bird Population Responses to Simulated Harvest Plans and Cumulative Effects of Disturbance. Front Ecol Evol. 8, 252. https://doi.org/10.3389/fevo.2020.00252

Webinar: Managed Forests for Birds in the Boreal Transition Region of the US and Canada

On June 3, 2020, the Boreal Avian Modelling Project in partnership with the SFI Conservation Team and the American Bird Conservancy (ABC) delivered an e-workshop on Managed Forests for Birds in the Boreal Transition Region of the US and Canada. The goal of the workshop was to engage forest management organizations and other interested parties in the Boreal Transition Zone of the Lake States and Ontario in the role of active forest management in bird conservation.

The objectives of this e-workshop were to:

  • Better understand the forest management practices, objectives, ownership patterns and other landscape factors in the study area;
  • Identify opportunities for forest management decisions to significantly influence bird habitat conditions;
  • Identify potential tools, products, training, and outreach materials to help inform forest management decisions;
  • Propose a collaborative framework for gaining and sharing scientifically-based knowledge about forest management effects on birds; and
  • Form a working group from forestry and conservation to address opportunities for birds of conservation concern.

BAM team member Andy Crosby is part of the team leading this co-produced research project. If you have management responsibility in the U.S. northern Lake States or northwest Ontario, Canada (Bird Conservation Region 12), this research project may be of particular interest to you. If you have avian point count data from this region, we would appreciate data contributions to support this work. Please contact us if you are interested in learning more about this project.

Functional response models to quantify habitat selection

Explanatory models of differential habitat selection

Functional response models to quantify habitat selection while accounting for habitat availability in the surrounding region

© Benoît Audet

Project Summary

BAM is developing explanatory models of differential habitat selection (DHS) to better predict changes to bird populations in changing landscapes. These models account for the way differences in habitat availability and species density interact to affect population size and distribution, known as a functional response. In 2019-2020, we summarized habitat distribution at the landscape scale using the Common Attribute Schema for Forest Resource Inventories (CASFRI) database. CASFRI is a standardized compilation of spatially explicit forest resource inventory data from across Canada. We then developed preliminary functional response models that explain a portion of DHS in Black-throated Green Warbler. To accurately predict future distributions and population sizes in response to changing landscapes, it is essential that models account for the effect of habitat availability on the habitat selection process. These models show promise for making better density predictions outside the spatial and temporal bounds of the data to which they were fit.  The next step is to fully develop these models for integration with TARDIS, a forest landscape simulation model, to estimate the effects of different forest harvest strategies on bird populations at a national extent.

Contact us for more information about this project.